DPI finds no problem with school roofs, conditions

Jul. 05, 2014 @ 04:23 PM

Representatives from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s Plant Instruction staff visited Indian Trail Elementary and Sun Valley High School in early June to look at the buildings and inspect the roofs. 

The visit was requested by the school board after several parents requested it during the debate over redistricting. 

A letter explained that after initial contact, DPI staff decided the inspections would start with two school facilities that, according to Union County Public Schools staff, had received a large amount of community feedback. 

Both reports state that there were no structural issues with the roof systems and both buildings were “in a much better condition than originally anticipated by the observer.” 

Indian Trail Elementary School was inspected May 6 according to a report from DPI. According to the letter, the facility department gave the inspectors half-size drawings for the school and information about the building, which gave “reasonable depictions” of the construction. 

The report said the additions added over the years, in general, work well together “considering the constraints placed upon each construction’s designer.” 

The report said the design and construction of Indian Trail Elementary School is “typical” for school construction in North Carolina, where roofing systems consist of flat and sloping installations. 

The inspectors wrote that no soft spots were observed while walking the rooftops and no structural failures were observed on the inside of the building or on the roof, according to the report. 

The report noted that areas of re-roofing had occurred and the Union County Public Schools facility staff told the representatives about additional re-roofing projects that are scheduled for the summer months. 

“It appeared very little leakage had occurred int he building and that incidents had been remedied quickly,” the report read. “The observed construction and maintenance of the roofs appeared to be typical for k-12 educational facilities.” 

Additional comments on the report state that the roofing maintenance plan described to the DPI staff, as described, was “practical and sensible” and that the described plan dealt with re-roofing major programs in a “methodical and pro-active manner.” 

It also noted that the facilities appear well-maintained and very little cracking of masonry was observed. 

“The buildings have benefited from sound regular maintenance and, as such, serve the purpose of the original designers,” the report on Indian Trail Elementary School concluded. “Continued maintenance will allow these facilities to continue to function serving the school system and community in the future.” 

Structural staff from DPI’s Plant Operation Section also visited Sun Valley High School on May 6, the report about the high school is similar to the elementary school report. 

The staff from DPI received similar information about Sun Valley High School as they did for Indian Trail, including a basic floor plan layout and typical section details outlining construction. The report stated that the construction was typical for schools. 

The report for Sun Valley High School also stated that no soft spots or structural roofing failures were observed while walking the rooftops and inspecting inside the school. 

“It appeared very little leakage had occurred in the building and that incidents had been remedied quickly,” the report stated. “The facilities appear well maintained. Very little cracking of masonry was observed.” 

The report also described the plan described by UCPS staff as practical and sensible. 

“The buildings have benefited from sound regular maintenance and, as such, serve the purpose of the original designers,” the Sun Valley High School report also read. “Continued maintenance will allow these facilities to continue to function serving the school system and community in the future.”