Letters to the Editor

May. 10, 2014 @ 03:41 PM

Thoughts of my mother

My mother, Lena Jenkins Mullis, was born on January 12, 1897. She died on January 25, 1952, at age 55. I was serving in the United States Marine Corps at that time.

My father, Franklin C. Mullis, was born on Sept. 5, 1893 and died on May 25, 1975, at age 81. I got my siblings together to go through some personal things he had in a big trunk. In the bottom of that trunk I found letters that had been written to him when he was away during World War I. Most of the letters were written by his older sister, Aunt Retta Haigler. In one of her letters, she told my father that his older brother Alfred had gotten married. She stated that he married a young school teacher and “seemed right pleased with it.” She went on to say that “Camp seems to put marriage into the minds of the young men, and I wouldn’t be siurprised if that happens to you.”

I do not have the letters he wrote back to her, but in a letter she later wrote to him, she stated:

“In reference to your question about a young lady that I would recommend for your wife, I think you would have bdetter thoughts about that than I would, but there is one young lady that I think is very exceptional. Her name is Lena Jenkins.”

That was my mother. I wish I could thank my aunt for her recommendation to my father. My mother has been gone now for 62 years. Aunt Retta could not have known at that time just how exceptional my mother really was. She stood five feet and one inches tall with her shoes on. I graduated from high school standing 6 feet, three inches tall,  bare foot.

One of my goals in life has been to stand as tall as my mother. I am still trying but I don’t consider that I have made it yet.

Ward Mullis

Monroe

Week recognizes the work of nurses

This week (May 6-12), the W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center honors the dedicated men and women we in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) consider to be the compassionate backbone of the Veterans’ health care system — nurses.

The theme of National Nurses Week 2014 is “Nurses Leading the Way,” and no one puts more passion into the health care profession than VA nurses. VA is the Nation’s largest single employer of nurses and VA nurses lead their profession in education and training, clinical responsibility and research, but their passion comes from VA’s mission — caring for Veterans.

VA nurses are integral and equal members of our health care team of professionals. No health care professional is closer to the Veterans we care for than a VA nurse. Veterans and families rely on them for their compassion and the VA relies on them for setting the highest clinical care standards.  That reliance is well placed.  VA’s recognition as a leader in health care, patient safety and research is due in large part to nurses.

I am deeply proud to be associated with the nurses who serve Veterans at the W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center and of all of our Nation’s 3.1 million registered nurses who work tirelessly to keep us well and save lives around the clock every day.

Garett Schreier MSN, RN

Associate Director, PCS/ Executive Nurse

   Our 8th amendment — Cruel and unusual punishment

If you watched TV this past week you certainly got your yearly supply of ‘awful death syndrome’.

I certainly got enough to cause me to rethink the death penalty.

My thoughts on this have swung back and forth like a pendulum for years.

At age 86 I think I have a better view of death than when I was 40.

Here is a summary of my 86 year old reaction:

How many of us spent as much time this past year visiting a loved one in hospice care ?

Given a choice of ‘lethal injection’ or a final death watch with any of the top causes of death:

Heart disease, Cancer, Respiratory diseases, Stroke, Accidents, Alzheimer’s,

Diabetes, Kidney disease, Influenza and pneumonia, Suicide, Septicemia, Liver disease, Hypertension, Parkinson’s, Pneumonitis

Which choice will you make ?

Lloyd Weichinger

Waxhaw

  Is redistrricting really necessary?

My name is Collin  Love. I am a Boy Scout with Troop 46 in Wesley Chapel. As part of my requirement for my communications Eagle badge, I am to write a letter to an editor regarding an issue that concerns me.

My family and I have lived in Wesley Chapel for 12 years and like a lot of families, this area ws chosen by my parents for the excellent schools. As you are much aware, Union County Public Schools has redistricted 6,000 kids going into the 2014-2015 school year. I am grateful that being a rising junior I am able to finish at my current high school. My little brother who is a rising 6th grader  will be in a new cluster.

Going to middle school is a big change regardless and adding a whole new school district makes him very nervous. He has always been very supportive of my athletic activities and has looked forward to attending the same schools as his big brother. I know there is nothing that will change the situation my parents have been very positive about redistricting because they don’t want my brother to worry. I just hate that my brother and so many other kids have to go through this unnecessary change. I hate my parents and many other parents will be pulled in different directions for after-school activities, getting kids to school spread apart and sporting events. I know there are bigger issues in the world and even in our community, but education is important. If I thought doing all this shuffling around would solve the long-term problem or even more that two years, I could understand it a little better. Looking at the future projections, it simply moves kids from cluster and overcrowding the new cluster the students will be in a short period of time.

Thank you for listening and responding back to my letter. I would like to know your thoughts.

Collin Love

Monroe

  Make your insurance choices wisely

Life insurance is the most responsible, cost effective way to take care of our loved ones. The past is a cancelled check and the future is promised to no one. The only time each of us has is right now.

We need to recognize that the government cannot do everything. It is up to each of us to understand the meaning of the word responsibility. It means to respond with ability. Our family is depending upon us to do this. Because the future is uncertain we need to consider how we are going to discharge our responsibilities. If we were no longer around to pay the mortgage, how would it get paid? If we were no longer around to be the bread winner, who would provide for our family? If we were to leave this world prematurely for whatever reason, who would pay my final expenses. And last, but not least, who is going to pay for my children to get a college education?

Most of us know that college debt has passed the $1 trillion mark and that many college graduates are struggling to pay off their college loans.

As it is stated in “1Timothy 5:8”: “But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.”  Buying life insurance can be one of the best financial steps you can take for you and your family. Do it now. The younger you are, the cheaper it is to buy what you need. When you spend your money, do it wisely by talking with a person who is both knowledgeable and has your best interests in mind.

Byron J. Ward

Marshville